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Rack your brains and Help!/ 37

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack your brains and Help!/ 37
Message de here4u posté le 23-12-2018 à 22:18:58 (S | E | F)
Hello, Dearest Friends,

Voici Le RYB suivant un peu plus tôt, puisque j'avais un peu anticipé le dernier (the latest one) afin de ne pas devoir rendre les différentes séries d'exercices en même temps et de pouvoir consacrer un peu de temps à ma famille ... Ceci vous fera aussi, je pense, des fêtes plus allégées (je ne parle que du point de vue de l'anglais, bien sûr ... )
Cet exercice est toujours un Sa correction sera postée le dimanche 13 janvier 2019, tard. Bon courage … May you have THE FORCE for the brand new Year. Best wishes to all of You !

I) Please, Help My Student! : ) He really needs you!

Comme la plupart des RYBs précédents, ce texte s'inspire (mais ne copie pas ... ) plusieurs textes de la presse écrite ou orale. Quant à ce pauvre élève, il a encore, malgré tout, fait 20 fautes, mais comme il est "consistent", il en répète toujours un certain nombre ...
Go for it!
*** ATTENTION ! Ce texte contient des fautes (qu'il convient de corriger ...)

Far of snuggling up in warm winter jackets, come December the Southern Hemisphere’s residents are down to their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair – but what can you really expect? To help you imagining what is it to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we’ve rounded up what we like better about the “silly season” at the equator.
If you’re enough lucky to spend the holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport. Whereas it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won’t go angry. Australians tend to relish in seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking to the waters to try out new pool toys and the all family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
Pine apples, like Australians, are lucky enough to be allowed to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere’s favorite locations: the beach. Like to that wearing and eating, don’t forget your jandals (flip flops) and to let place room for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25th. While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with vibrant red bubble-like flowers during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more of a Christmas lunch, with minced pie and glazed gammon,-(ham !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the bigger difference between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t rebate what goes on at the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it some day.

II) Find the «scrambled » words in the first two sentences.
Then please, reorder the words in the last three sentences so as to make meaningful sentences... (and please, tell me which sort of exercise you prefer and which one you find more difficult…)


1) SVASERC, wool SCSKO, a warm and YOSC EAPRFCLEI, GNGOGE, hot EAOOCTLCH, Christmas SERMTKA, and WNOS — these are some of the SNHGIT that YEADMILTIEM come to DINM NHEW we KITNH of Christmas.

2) In NPJAA hand-made IAIOMGR, paper STRANENL, and other DTACNHEFRDA SOTRCDNIAOE EINL up the LNIIATAOTDR YDLHAIO tree;

3) TREES/ DECORATE/ OF/ SOUTHERN/ PEOPLE/ PALM/ AFRICA/ PARTS/ IN/

4) LANTERNS/ FLOWERS/ PAPER/ WITH/ ARE/ AND/ IN/ CHRISTMAS/ AND/ CHAINS/ HANDMADE/ ADORNED/ CHINA/ JAPAN/ TREES/

5) BLANKETS/ CHILDREN/ TRANSLATED/ BEEF/ STUFFED/ NINOS/ SOMETHING/ ARGENTINIANS/ IN/ CALLED/ TO/ ROLLS/ ENVUELTOS/ SERVE/ /

Good luck, good work! I give you the FORCE.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de taiji43, postée le 30-12-2018 à 18:24:57 (S | E)
Happy New Year Here 4U, Lucile83 and all my friends

Here is my correction
READY TO BE CORRECTED

Far FROM snuggling up in warm winter jackets, come December the Southern Hemisphere’s residents are down (= optés pour to) their shorts and t-shirts.
Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair – but what can you really expect? To help you IMAGE what is it to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns ? (il manque le ?) , we’ve rounded up what we like THE BEST about the “silly season”OVER the equator.
If you’re lucky ENOUGH to spend the holidays in Australia, pack extra SUN BLOCK and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport.
Whereas it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won’t GET angry.
Australians tend to RELISH seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly.
Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking to the waters to try out new pool toys and the WHOLE family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
Pine apples, like Australians, are lucky enough to be allowed to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere’s FAVOURITE locations: the beach. : ABOUT WHAT TO TO WEAR AND EAT , don’t forget your jandals (flip flops) and to LEAVE place room for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25th.
While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with vibrant red bubble-like flowers during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more of a Christmas lunch, with minced- MEAT pie and glazed gammon,-(MIAM !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the BIGGEST difference between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have theirChristmas meal on December 24 and often CELEBRATED (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t REBATE what goes on OVER the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy.
You should try it some day.

READY TO BE CORRECTED IN 2019
HAPPY NEW YEAR


1 )SCARVES, woo l SOCKS , a warm and COSY FIREPLACE ,EGG- NOG hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS, and WONS— these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas.

2) In JAPAN hand-made ORIGAMI, paper LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFT HANDCART DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLYDAY tree;

3) TREES/ DECORATE/ OF/ SOUTHERN/ PEOPLE/ PALM/ AFRICA/ PARTS/ IN/
In parts of southern Africa people decorate palm trees

4) LANTERNS/ FLOWERS/ PAPER/ WITH/ ARE/ AND/ IN/ CHRISTMAS/ AND/ CHAINS/ HANDMADE/ ADORNED/ CHINA/ JAPAN/ TREES/
In Japan and China , the Christmas trees are handmade adorned with paper chains, flowers and lanterns.

5) BLANKETS/ CHILDREN/ TRANSLATED/ BEEF/ STUFFED/ NINOS/ SOMETHING/ ARGENTINIANS/ IN/ CALLED/ TO/ ROLLS/ ENVUELTOS/ SERVE/ /
Argentians serve something called ninos envueltos, stuffed beef rolls translated to children in blankets.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de alpiem, postée le 31-12-2018 à 11:58:12 (S | E)
Hello everybody here is my rack 37,,READY TO BE CORRECTED

Far FROM snuggling up in warm winter jackets, come December the Southern Hemisphere’s residents are down to their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair – but what can you really expect? To help you IMAGINE what it IS SWAPPING snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we’ve rounded up what we like better about the “silly season” at the equator.
If you’re LUCKY ENOUGH to spend the holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport. Whereas it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you WILL go HUNGRY.Australians tend to relish in seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking to the WATER to try out new pool toys and the WHOLE family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
Pineapples, like Australians, are lucky enough to be allowed to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere’s favorite locations: the beach.IN ADDITION TO that wearing and eating, don’t forget your Sandals (flip flops) and to let place for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25th. While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with
vibrant red bubble-like flowers during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more of a Christmas lunch, with minced pie and glazed gammon,-(ham !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the bigger difference between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often NOT celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on january 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t DISPARAGE what goes on at the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it some day.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de magie8, postée le 31-12-2018 à 19:22:28 (S | E)
bonjour , nous finissons l'année ensemble 2018 dernier jour, c est reparti pour une nouvelle année bonne saint Sylvestre avec champagne et cotillons pour tout le monde Recevez tous mes voeux de bonheur , bonne santé , Amour, argent et tout ce que vous désirez

Bon pour correction
Far FROM snuggling up in warm winter jackets, come December the Southern Hemisphere’s residents are down to their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair – but what can you really expect? To help you IMAGINE what is it to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we’ve rounded up what we like beST about the “silly season” BELOW the equator.
If you’re LUCKY ENOUGH to spend the holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport. WHILE it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won’t go HUNGRY. Australians tend to relish EATING( or to relish SANS IN )* seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking to the waters to try out new pool toys and the WHOLE family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
Pine apples,???? JE DIRAIS plutôt KIWIS ** like Australians, are lucky enough to be ABLE to*** celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere’s favorite locations: the beach. AS FOR WHAT TO WEAR AND EAT, don’t forget your jandals??? SANDALS (flip flops) and to LEAVE place room for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25th. While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with vibrant red bALL-like flowers or BAUBLE-like ( des fleurs comme des balles ou comme des boules rouge? des colifichets de noel? ) during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more of a Christmas lunch, with MINCE PIES and glazed gammon,-(ham !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the BIGGEST difference between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t rebate?? (ne réduisez pas, n'abaissez pas) do not FORGIVE(n'oubliez pas)do not DISREGARD(n'ignorez pas, ne négligez pas) what goes on BELOW the equator!( ce qui se passe sous l'Equateur) Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it some day.

*j'ai trouvé to relish doing:trouver du plaisir à faire, on pourrait dire to relish eating( trouver du plaisir à manger des fruits de mer) ou to relish:savourer quelque chose pas avec in dans les synonymes j' ai trouvé avec in to pleasure in, to delight in ,to indulge in:prendre du plaisir dans quelque chose, avoir un faible pour /ça doit aller aussi.
** quand on lit le paragraphe jusqu'au bout il semble que l'on parle de la Nouvelle Zélande ( emblème c'est le kiwi mais pas le fruit,(l'oiseau bizarre avec des caractéristiques de mammifère) on dit aussi les Maoris(bien qu'ils ne le soient pas tous) sont la race première très nombreux sur l île du Nord et ont bien imprimé le pays de leur culture )
*** j'ai remplacé allowed pour moi idée d'autorisation, ils ont la capacité c'est le temps qui le permet,ils n'ont pas besoin de demander la permission peut etre ai je tort les nuances sont toujours difficiles !!



READY TO CORRECT

II) Find the «scrambled » words in the first two sentences.
Then please, reorder the words in the last three sentences so as to make meaningful sentences... (and please, tell me which sort of exercise you prefer and which one you find more difficult…)

1)SCARVE , wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG( liqueur aux oeufs) hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS, and SNOW — these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas.

2) In JAPAN hand-made ORIGAMI, paper LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree;

3) TREES/ DECORATE/ OF/ SOUTHERN/ PEOPLE/ PALM/ AFRICA/ PARTS/ IN/
In parts of Southern Africa, people decorate palm trees

4) LANTERNS/ FLOWERS/ PAPER/ WITH/ ARE/ AND/ IN/ CHRISTMAS/ AND/ CHAINS/ HANDMADE/ ADORNED/ CHINA/ JAPAN/ TREES/
In Japan and China the Christmas trees are hanmade and adorned(ornés)with paper chains,flowers and lanterns.

5) BLANKETS/ CHILDREN/ TRANSLATED/ BEEF/ STUFFED/ NINOS/ SOMETHING/ ARGENTINIANS/ IN/ CALLED/ TO/ ROLLS/ ENVUELTOS/ SERVE/ /
Argentians serve something called ninos envueltos(wrapped up kids)stuffed beef rolls translated to children in blankets
Les Argentins
servent quelque chose appelé ninos envuelto ( bébés emmaillotés) ce sont des rouleaux( de pain ou chou) farcis
de boeuf qui ressemblent( font penser)à des enfants enveloppés dans une couverture.

chére here4u je ne saurais pas te dire celui que je préfère , je trouve que c 'est bien d'avoir 2 lignes de chaque ; pour moi au niveau difficulté je trouve plus facile le scramble ,mais cela dépend des mots certains sautent aux yeux tout de suite d autres demandent 3 jours alors au bout d un moment j abandonne
remettre les mots dans l' ordre c'est rare que ma phrase soit correcte, j ai toujours un mot pas à sa place.


-------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 07-01-2019 13:22
Bug police réparé.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de nate, postée le 02-01-2019 à 18:21:22 (S | E)
Hello

READY FOR CORRECTION

I kind of accidentally ran into the text on the Internet… but didn’t cheat. As a matter of fact, before I finished my work off I sort of swapped something for something else though I felt ambivalent about it. Then I saw the text (the actual version of it) and afterward, I came back to my first thought. As for the rest of the text as you may see this is the result of my relentless efforts , which haven’t paid off as much as I’d have like to.

I) Please, Help My Student!

Far FROM snuggling up (Ici j’ai un doute. Selon Webster : To snuggle up = intransitive verb = ‘to curl up comfortably or cozily’. Hors je ne vois pas cette notion de « curl up » avec des vêtements. MUFFLING YOURSELF me semble une meilleure alternative.) in warm winter jackets, come December the Southern Hemisphere’s residents are down to their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of MATTER – but what can you really expect? To help you (to) IMAGINE what IT IS to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we’ve rounded up what we like THE MOST about the “silly season” BELOW the equator.
If you’re LUCKY ENOUGH to spend the holidays in Australia, pack AN extra sunblock (or extra SUNBLOCKS) and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport. (AL)THOUGH it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won’t GET angry. Australians tend to relish in seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking (to = non) the waters to try out new pool toys and (the = non) all (OF) THE family / (or the WHOLE family) enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
PINEAPPLES, like Australians, are lucky enough to be allowed to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore CAVES in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, BASK IN one of the Southern Hemisphere’s favorite locations: the beach. AS FAR AS EATING AND CLOTHING ARE CONCERNED, don’t forget your jandals (flip flops) and SAVE room for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25th. While they do (ok mais la forme emphatique me paraît toutefois étrange. Je pense que le présent simple serait encore mieux pour se plonger dans l'instant T) decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms INTO vibrant red bubble-like flowers during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more of a Christmas lunch, with minced pie and glazed gammon,-(ham !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the BIGGEST difference between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t REDUCE/RUN DOWN what goes on BELOW the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it some day.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de quaine, postée le 07-01-2019 à 12:03:56 (S | E)
Bonjour here4u,
Merci pour ce test. Je suis incapable de faire le 2), trop long, les mots ne me sautent pas aux yeux dès qu'il y a plus de deux syllabes.
En terme de préférence, le 1).

I) Please, Help My Student! : ) He really needs you!

Come December, Far of from snuggling up in warm winter jackets, the Southern Hemisphere's residents are down to their shorts and tee-shirts (T-shirts). Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair - but what can you really expect? To help you imagining imagine what is it to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we've rounded up what we like better best about the "silly season" at the equator.
If you're enough lucky enough to spend the holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport. Whereas it's uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won't go get angry (or go hungry? Depending on how food is important for you ;-)). Australians tend to relish in seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking taken to the waters to try out new pool toys and the all whole family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
Pine apples Kiwis, like Australians, are lucky enough to be allowed able to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere's favorite locations: the beach. Like to that wearing and eating, Regarding clothes and food, don't forget your jandals (flip flops) and to let place leave room for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December the 25th. While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own "Christmas tree," the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with vibrant red bubble-like flowers during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas "dinner" is more of a Christmas lunch, with minced pie and glazed gammon,-(ham !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating  food is likely to be eaten outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the bigger biggest difference between the Southern Hemisphere's English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don't rebate underestimate what goes on at the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it some day.
Note: "at the equator" serait plutôt "on the other side of the equator" géographiquement.
Note: December 24, the 24th of December, December the 25th? Pour ce dernier, pour garder l'homogénéité du texte, je mettrai December 25; mais pour poser la question sur ces horribles dates en anglais, j'ai mis December the 25th: right or wrong?

II) Find the «scrambled » words in the first two sentences. Then please, reorder the words in the last three sentences so as to make meaningful sentences... (and please, tell me which sort of exercise you prefer and which one you find more difficult...)
Comme expliqué au début, inutile de mettre ma réponse.
3) TREES/ DECORATE/ OF/ SOUTHERN/ PEOPLE/ PALM/ AFRICA/ PARTS/ IN/
In parts of southern Africa, people decorate palm trees

4) LANTERNS/ FLOWERS/ PAPER/ WITH/ ARE/ AND/ IN/ CHRISTMAS/ AND/ CHAINS/ HANDMADE/ ADORNED/ CHINA/ JAPAN/ TREES/
Christmas trees are adorned with chains, paper flowers and lanterns handmade in China and Japan.

5) BLANKETS/ CHILDREN/ TRANSLATED/ BEEF/ STUFFED/ NINOS/ SOMETHING/ ARGENTINIANS/ IN/ CALLED/ TO/ ROLLS/ ENVUELTOS/ SERVE/
Argentinians serve beef stuffed rolls called ninos envueltos, something translated to children in blankets.

-------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 07-01-2019 13:25
Mise en forme standard.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de joe39, postée le 07-01-2019 à 18:47:17 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u,
Here I’m with my work,
Ready to be corrected.


I) Please, Help My Student! : ) He really needs you!

Far FROM snuggling up in warm winter jackets, IN December, the Southern Hemisphere’s residents are down to their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair – but what can you really expect? To help you IMAGING what is it to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we’ve rounded up WHAT we like MORE OF the “silly season” at the equator.
If you’re enough lucky to spend the holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport.
Whereas it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you NEEDN’T TO GET angry.
Australians tend (to) relish (in) seafood DISHES, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and SWIMMING pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking to the waters to try out new pool toys and the WHOLE family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
PINEAPPLES, like Australians, are lucky enough to be allowed to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere’s FAVOURITE locations:

the beach. REGARDING DRESSING and eating, don’t forget your SANDALS (flip flops) and LEAVE ENOUGH ROOM for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25th.
While they do decorate PINETREES in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native EVERGREEN tree that blossoms with vibrant red bubble-like flowers during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more THAN a Christmas lunch, with MINCEMEAT pie and glazed gammon,-(YUM !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to TAKE PLACE outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the BIGGEST difference between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24TH and often celebrate (GIVING gifts) until Epiphany on January 6TH.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t rebate what goes on at the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it SOMEDAY.

II) Find the «scrambled » words in the first two sentences.
Then please, reorder the words in the last three sentences so as to make meaningful sentences... (and please, tell me which sort of exercise you prefer and which one you find more difficult…)

1) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and OSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG, hot CHCHOCOLATE, Christmas SKATER, and SNOW — these are some of the NIGHTS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas.

2) In JAPAN hand-made ORIGAMI, paper LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree;

3) TREES/ DECORATE/ OF/ SOUTHERN/ PEOPLE/ PALM/ AFRICA/ PARTS/ IN/

PEOPLE IN PARTS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA DECORATE PALM TREES

4) LANTERNS/ FLOWERS/ PAPER/ WITH/ ARE/ AND/ IN/ CHRISTMAS/ AND/ CHAINS/ HANDMADE/ ADORNED/ CHINA/ JAPAN/ TREES/

IN CHINA AND JAPAN CHRISTMAS TREES ARE ADORNED WITH HANDMADE PAPER LANTERNS, FLOWERS AND CHAINS

5) BLANKETS/ CHILDREN/ TRANSLATED/ BEEF/ STUFFED/ NINOS/ SOMETHING/ ARGENTINIANS/ IN/ CALLED/ TO/ ROLLS/ ENVUELTOS/ SERVE/ /

ARGENTINIANS SERVE BEEF TRANSLATED TO** STUFFED ROLLS, SOMETHING CALLED NIÑOS ENVUELTOS / CHILDREN IN BLANKETS

** INTO?

Many thanks for the great exercise.

I hope you have a nice week.

So long.
Joe39



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de tereda, postée le 08-01-2019 à 12:44:36 (S | E)
hello everyone,
my try ready to be corrected.

Far FROM snuggling up in warm winter jackets, come December the Southern Hemisphere’s residents are down to their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair – but what can you really expect? To help you IMAGINE what is it to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we’ve rounded up what we like THE BEST about the “silly season” AT or UNDER the equator.
If you’re LUCKY ENOUGH to spend THE holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport. Whereas it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won’t go angry HUNGRY . Australians tend to relish in seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking to the waters to try out new pool toys and ALL the family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
Pine apples??? KIWIS like Australians, are lucky enough to be allowed to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere’s favorite locations: the beach.
AS it is to WEAR FOR EATING, don’t forget your jandals (flip flops) and LET PLACE FOR a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25th. While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with vibrant red bubble-like flowers during the holidays.

In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more THAN a Christmas lunch, with minced pie and glazed gammon,-(ham !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the bigger difference between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t rebate REBUFF what goes on at the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion*** dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it SOMEDAY.

*** plats composés, mélangés,

II) Find the «scrambled » words in the first two sentences.

1) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY EAPRFCLEI EGGNOG, hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS, and SNOW — these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN WE THINK of Christmas.

2) In JAPAN, hand-made ORIGAMI, paper LANTERNS and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree.


3) In Southern Africa, people decorate parts of palm trees. 9


4) LANTERNS/ FLOWERS/ PAPER/ WITH/ ARE/ AND/ IN/ CHRISTMAS/ AND/ CHAINS/ HANDMADE/ ADORNED/ CHINA/ JAPAN/ TREES/

In Japan, and China, Christmas, TREES are adorned with handmade paper flowers chains and lanterns .


5) BLANKETS/ CHILDREN/ TRANSLATED/ BEEF/ STUFFED/ NINOS/ SOMETHING/ ARGENTINIANS/ IN/ CALLED/ TO/ ROLLS/ ENVUELTOS/ SERVE/

Argentinians serve something called 'niños envueltos', stuffed beef rolls translated to children in blankets.

For my part, I DO prefer to find a good sentence with some words, rather than the scrambled words, often difficult for me, even if I spend a lot of time.


Thank you for your long-awaited correction Here4u





Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de here4u, postée le 09-01-2019 à 22:43:40 (S | E)
Hello!

Encore beaucoup de temps, mais je commence demain à transférer les corrections.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de maxwell, postée le 11-01-2019 à 07:31:03 (S | E)
FINISHED
Hello Here4U
Thank you so much for this exercise because it was one of the most difficult ones I've worked on, and I'm gonna learn many things
Pour moi, reorder the words est de loin, le plus difficile quand le nombre de mots est trop grand (>12), sinon, c'est scrambled words qui est le plus difficile quand le nombre de lettres est trop grand (>6) et les lettres trop variées. Le mieux, c'est que tu proposes un peu des 2 à chaque fois, avec des degrés de difficulté différents (facile, moyen, dur)


I) Help my student:
Far FROM snuggling up in warm winter jackets, IN December the Southern Hemisphere's residents are OUT IN their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair ? but what can you really expect? To help you IMAGINE what it IS to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we've rounded up what we like MOST about the ?silly season? at the equator.
If you're lucky ENOUGH to spend the holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport. Whereas it's uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won't go HUNGRY. Australians tend to relish [] seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking to the waters to try out new pool toys and the WHOLE family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
PINEAPPLES(*), like Australians, are lucky enough to be allowed to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere's favorite locations: the beach.
AS FOR WHAT TO WEAR AND EAT, don't forget your [J]andals (flip flops) and to MAKE room for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25[]. While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own "Christmas tree", the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with vibrant red bubble-like flowers during the holidays.

In South-Africa, Christmas ?dinner? is more of a Christmas lunch, with minced pie and glazed gammon,-(ham !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the BIGGEST difference between the Southern Hemisphere's English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don't rebate what goes on at the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it SOMEDAY.

(*) Ca ne doit pas être la bonne réponse, ou alors je n'ai pas le même humour...

II) Find the scrambled words:
1) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG, hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS, and SNOW - these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas. 13/13
2) In JAPAN hand-made ORIGAMI, paper LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree; 8/8

III) Reorder the words:
3) PEOPLE DECORATE PALM TREES IN PARTS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA
4) CHRISTMAS TREES IN JAPAN AND CHINA ARE ADORNED WITH LANTERNS, PAPER CHAINS AND HANDMADE FLOWERS.
5) ARGENTINIANS SERVE TO CHILDREN BEEF ROLLS STUFFED IN BLANKETS / TRANSLATED INTO / SOMETHING CALLED NINOS ENVUELTOS



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de chocolatcitron, postée le 12-01-2019 à 17:45:43 (S | E)
Rack your brains and Help!/ 37
Message de here4u posté le 23-12-2018 à 22:18:58 (S | E | F) 13 janvier 2019 FINISHED!!!
Hello my dear Here4u : tu nous as gâtés, côté difficultés ! J'ai beaucoup cherché, me suis bien pris la tête, et j'ai aussi beaucoup appris, merci du fond du coeur !

Hi Everybody!

Here is my work:
I) Please, Help My Student! : ) He really needs you!
Quant à ce pauvre élève, il a encore, malgré tout, fait 20 fautes !

Far FROM snuggling up in warm winter jackets, come December the Southern Hemisphere’s residents are down to their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the South is a different kind of affair – but what can you really expect? To help you IMAGE what is it LIKE to swap snow for sun and pudding for prawns, we’ve rounded up what we like BEST about the “silly season” BELOW the equator.
If you’re 1) lucky ENOUGH to spend the holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport. WHILE it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won’t go 2) HUNGRY. Australians tend to 3) relish FOR seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly. Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking to the waters to try out new pool toys and the all family enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
4) KIWIS like Australians, are lucky enough to be 5) ALLOWED to celebrate Christmas outdoors. Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere’s favorite locations: the beach. AS FOR WHAT TO WEAR and EAT, don’t forget your jandals (flip flops) and to LEAVE place room for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25th. While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with vibrant red 6) BAUBLE-like flowers during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more of a Christmas lunch, with 7) MINCE pie and glazed gammon,-(ham!) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the BIGGEST difference between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t 8) DISCOUNT what goes on BELOW the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes, sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it some day.

1) Lucky enough (inversion des mots) = assez chanceux.
2) Angry = que viendrait faire la colère ??? !
3) To relish = aimer, apprécier, relish FOR sth, relish sth.
4) Pineapples???? Ce n'est pas la bonne période de récolte et il y en a qu'à l'extrême nord-est du Queesland au climat équatorial...
Lien internet
, Euh... une peuplade alors ??? J'ai cherché et je n'ai pas trouvé une qui soit aussi le nom d'un fruit... et soit australienne. Mais la Nouvelle-Zélande est limitrophe, et un de ses symboles est le kiwi : l'oiseau mammifère... Le kiwi se trouve aussi être un fruit... d'où ma déduction : oui je sais, c'est tiré par les cheveux, et fort heureusement il m'en reste encore, pour le prochain forum... !
5) To be allowed to : permission, pas une possibilité !
6) Bauble-like = qui ressemblent à des boules de Noël.
7) Mince pie = tartelette fourrée de fruits secs à Noël en Grande-Bretagne.
8) Discount = ignorer. (= Overlook, ignore, snub, neglect... le choix des mots est copieux, mais discount est un faux-ami ici, et c'est celui que je préfère utiliser : j'ai sans doute tort ! )


II) Find the «scrambled » words in the first two sentences.
Then please, reorder the words in the last three sentences so as to make meaningful sentences... (and please, tell me which sort of exercise you prefer and which one you find more difficult…)

1) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG (lait de poule), hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS, and SNOW — these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas.
2) In JAPAN hand-made ORIGAMI, paper LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITITIONAL HOLIDAY tree.

3) IN SOUTHERN PARTS OF AFRICA PEOPLE DECORATE PALM TREES.
4) CHRISTMAS TREES IN JAPAN AND CHINA ARE ADORNED WITH LANTERNS FLOWERS AND CHAINS PAPER HANDMADE .
5) ARGENTINIANS SERVE TO CHILDREN BEEF ROLLS STUFFED BLANKETS TRANSLATED IN SOMETHING CALLED NINOS ENVUELTOS.

Personnellement, je préfère nettement le premier jeu où l'on doit remettre les lettres dans le bon ordre, plutôt que le dernier où il faut remettre les mots dans le bon ordre... !

I give you back the FORCE... ! Have a very sweet week!
See you soon.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de here4u, postée le 13-01-2019 à 23:36:07 (S | E)
Hello!

Voilà votre correction ! Ce devoir vous aurait désespérés … certaines s’y seraient même arraché les cheveux … Je me sens très coupable … Pourtant, lorsque je regarde, vous avez, à nouveau très bien réussi et je n’y vois pas de réelles difficultés … (Juste deux petites blagues qui n’ont pas toujours été comprises … Pas grave !)
Certains m’ont dit être « tombés sur l'un des documents illustrant l’idée centrale du texte », d’autres les ont, de toute évidence cherchés … Ne vous y trompez pas, mes antennes de « prof un peu expérimenté » savent et sentent très vite ces choses rien qu’à la lecture du travail rendu … Mais pourquoi ne le feriez-vous pas ? Si cette recherche se fait APRES avoir travaillé, et retravaillé beaucoup, dans ce cas, je ne suis pas contre … Cependant, je continue à croire, et à écrire, [oui, je sais je rabâche ! – ça aussi, c’est un « devoir » de prof, j’assume ! -] qu’il n'y a aucun intérêt à rechercher, d’emblée, le ou les extraits originels et originaux. Le seul intérêt est de saisir le document final "à bras le texte" , et de vous "battre" avec ... Go for it! C'est en faisant ceci que vous pouvez travailler vraiment, et donc, j’en suis certaine, progresser.

Je fais, bien sûr, appel à toutes les bonnes volontés pour TRAVAILLER SUR LE « FOLLOW UP WORK » qui doit venir « boucler » tout travail constructif avant de passer à la suite. PLEASE... Je voudrais vraiment voir ce travail « post première correction » (Oups ! « deuxième correction », puisque vous avez déjà la vôtre …) s’amplifier et se généraliser … (Un volontaire de plus pourrait, par exemple, nous donner un lien vers l'un des documents « inspirateurs », ou vers une illustration … Je suis ouverte à toute suggestion …

I) Please, Help My Student! : ) He really needs you!

Far from (1) snuggling up in warm winter jackets, come December the Southern Hemisphere’s (**) residents are down to their shorts and t-shirts. Yes, Christmas in the south is a different kind of affair – but what can you really expect? To help you imagine (2) what it’s like (3) to swap snow for sun, and pudding for prawns, we’ve rounded up what we like best (4) about the “silly season” below (5) the equator.
If you’re lucky enough to spend (6) the holidays in Australia, pack extra sunblock and be prepared for three other delights: seafood, salads, and sport./// While (7) it’s uncommon to eat a hot meal, you won’t go hungry (8). Australians tend to indulge in (9) seafood platters, fish, cold turkey and ham, pavlova, and of course, a glass of ultra-chilled bubbly (10). Your own backyard and pool are important parts of Christmas Day, with kids taking the waters to try out new pool toys and the whole family (11) enjoying a game of backyard cricket.
Kiwis (12), like Australians, are lucky enough to be able (13) to celebrate Christmas outdoors. /// Kids have a long summer break during the holiday season, meaning families can hike; explore coves in and around waterside cities; camp; and of course, inhabit one of the Southern Hemisphere’s favorite locations: the beach. As for what to wear and eat (14), don’t forget your jandals (15) (flip flops) and to leave room (16) for a long afternoon lunch of salads and seafood on December 25. While they do decorate pine trees in their homes, New Zealanders have their own “Christmas tree,” the Pōhutukawa, a native tree that blossoms with vibrant red bauble-like flowers (17) during the holidays.
In South-Africa, Christmas “dinner” is more of a Christmas lunch, with mince pies (18) and glazed gammon,-(ham !) or turkey, roast duck, roast beef on the braai (barbecue). /// You might also get to try yellow rice with raisins, ice cream cakes, and malva pudding. All this eating is likely to happen outdoors in the hot weather.
Perhaps the biggest difference (19) between the Southern Hemisphere’s English and Spanish-speaking countries is that Latinos have their Christmas meal on December 24 and often celebrate (give gifts) until Epiphany on January 6.
Sure, snow, frost, and roasted chestnuts are picturesque, but don’t discount (20) (rebate) what goes on below (5) the equator! Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere is fun, outdoorsy, full of fusion dishes (21), sunshine, and light-hearted joy. You should try it some day!

(1)Far FROM / Close TO
(**)Capitalize such words as northern, southern, eastern, and western when they refer to the people in a region or to their political, social, or cultural activities. Do not capitalize these words when they merely indicate general location or refer to the geography or climate of the region.
(2)To help you imagine OU to help you TO imagine (un peu moins utilisé, mais correct), mais surtout pas « imagining ».
(3) … imagine what it is like … what = ce qui/ ce que . Si vous mettez what is it like ? = une interrogative directe.
(4) What we like best => implique une appréciation entre plus de deux éléments.
(5) BELOW = AU DESSOUS DE
(6) Lucky enough to do something : lucky enough  adjectif + ENOUGH alors que « enough » se place devant un NOM : enough money/ enough time/ enough luck…
(7) While = pendant que (plutôt utilisé pour exprimer du temps) // Whereas= alors que (plutôt pour exprimer une opposition entre deux personnes ou deux possibilités.)
(8) Ne pas confondre To be HUNGRY = avoir FAIM et To be ANGRY= être en colère.
(9) Attention « to relish something »: « to indulge in something ».
(10) bubbly= du champagne ou toute boisson à bulles.
(11) The whole family= la famille entière (considérée comme un tout, une entité) ; all the + nom en général dénombrable pluriel.
(12) A kiwi= En anglais, « kiwi » a 3 sens différents … Lien internet

Well, OK, that was British humour… and as one of you said, «not everyone has the same humour» … but I found it funny… and you must admit it was tricky…
(13) Il ne s’agissait pas ici d’une autorisation (to be allowed to), mais d’une possibilité, capacité (able to).
(14) As for= quant à = considering … Considering what you have to wear…
(15) Il s’agissait bien de « jandals » = Lien internet

(16)To leave room= laisser la place.
(17) A BAUBLE= une décoration de Noël



(18)MINCE PIES= Lien internet
n’ont rien à voir avec « minced meat pies »= Lien internet

(19)=> Choix entre plus de 2 éléments => forme superlative de l’adjectif.
(20) Rebate= Lien internet
; un synonyme = Lien internet
qui, lui aussi, a plusieurs sens. Bon d’accord, celui-ci était difficile … et un peu tiré par les cheveux …
(21) « nuclear dishes » était un (mauvais) jeu de mots pour « fusion dishes » … Eh … il faut bien que je m’amuse un peu …

II) Find the «scrambled » words in the first two sentences. Then please, reorder the words in the last three sentences so as to make meaningful sentences...

1) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG, hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS, and SNOW — these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas.

2) In JAPAN, ORIGAMI, hand-made LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree;

3) IN PARTS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA, PEOPLE DECORATE PALM TREES ;

4) CHRISTMAS TREES IN CHINA AND JAPAN ARE ADORNED WITH HANDMADE PAPER CHAINS, FLOWERS AND LANTERNS.

5) ARGENTINIANS SERVE SOMETHING CALLED « NINOS ENVUELTOS », STUFFED BEEF ROLLS TRANSLATED TO « CHILDREN IN BLANKETS ».

Merci à tous les volontaires qui voudront bien participer aux traductions ... Bravo à tous Je suis contente et fière de votre bon travail, de vos efforts et de vous avoir appris quelques petites choses !



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de magie8, postée le 14-01-2019 à 00:28:42 (S | E)
bonjour je traduis les phrases

II) Find the «scrambled » words in the first two sentences. Then please, reorder the words in the last three sentences so as to make meaningful sentences...

1) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG, hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS, and SNOW — these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas.
Echarpes, chaussettes de laine et un coin du feu chaud et douillet, un lait de poule , un chocolat chaud, les marchés de Noêl et la neige font partie des choses qui viennent immédiatement à l'esprit quand on pense à Noêl

2) In JAPAN, ORIGAMI, hand-made LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree;
au Japon , origami, lanternes faites à la main et autres décorations de création artisanale, s'installent sur le traditionnel arbre de fête

3) IN PARTS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA, PEOPLE DECORATE PALM TREES ;
dans des endroits d'Afrique du Sud les gens décorent les palmiers

4) CHRISTMAS TREES IN CHINA AND JAPAN ARE ADORNED WITH HANDMADE PAPER CHAINS, FLOWERS AND LANTERNS.
les arbres de noêl en Chine et au Japon sont ornés avec des guirlandes , des fleurs et des lanternes de papier faites à la main

5) ARGENTINIANS SERVE SOMETHING CALLED « NINOS ENVUELTOS », STUFFED BEEF ROLLS TRANSLATED TO « CHILDREN IN BLANKETS ».
En Argentine ils servent quelque chose appelé: Ninos envueltos( Bébé emmaillotés) , rouleaux farcis de boeuf qui font penser à des enfants enveloppés dans une couverture



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de magie8, postée le 15-01-2019 à 14:56:13 (S | E)
bonjour, traduction du texte
Loin de se pelotonner dans des chauds manteaux d'hiver, quand arrive décembre , les résidents de l'hémisphére sud sortent leur shorts et leur t-shirts.OUI Noêl dans le sud est une sorte d'affaire complètement différente.- Mais que pouvez- vous réellement espérer ? pour vous aider à imaginer ce que c'est que d'échanger la neige pour le soleil et le pudding contre des crevettes.Nous avons fait le tour du meilleur de la saison des fêtes au dessous de l'équateur.
Noêl là, où les eucalyptus poussent il n'y a pas de gel ni de neige' c'est ce qui se dit dans une chanson Australienne.Eh oui, c'est bien vrai. Si vous avez assez de chance pour passer les vacances en Australie, prenez un supplément d'écran total solaire et soyez préparés pour trois autres plaisirs:fruits de mer, salades et sport.Bien qu'il soit peu commun de manger un repas chaud , vous n'aurez pas faim.Les Australiens ont tendance à savourer des plateaux de fruits de mer, de la dinde froide et du jambon, le gâteau pavlova et bien sûr un verre de vin pétillant.
Votre propre jardin et la piscine prennent une part importante en ce jour de Noêl avec les enfants s'ébattant dans l'eau pour essayer les nouveaux jouets de piscine et toute la famille appréciant le jeu de cricket dans l'arrière cour.
Les" KIWIS" comme les Australiens sont assez chanceux pour avoir la possibilité de célébrer Noêl dehors.Les enfants ont une longue coupure pendant la période des fêtes ,ce qui veut dire que les familles peuvent faire des randonnées, explorer les criques et les alentours des villes balnéaires. Faire du camping et bien sûr occuper l'un des meilleurs endroits de l'hémisphère sud : la plage
Et quant à envisager ,quoi porter et manger n'oubliez pas vos jandals(tongs)et de laisser de la place pour un long déjeuner de salades et de fruits de mer qui durera toute l'après midi du 25 décembre.Bien qu'ils décorent chez eux des sapins , les Néo Zélandais possèdent leur propre arbre de Noêl le Pohutukawa, un arbre endémique qui donne des fleurs rouge vif comme des boules de noêl pendant la saison des fêtes .
Le dîner sud africain ressemble davantage à un déjeuner de Noel avec ses tartelettes minces et le jambon en gelée ou la dinde , canard rôti et rosbif cuit au barbecue.Vous pourrez aussi essayer le riz jaune aux raisins.le gâteau à la crême glacée et le pudding malva, toute cette nourriture se dégustera en plein air par temps chaud .Peut être la plus grande différence entre l'hémisphère sud anglais et les pays parlant espagnol est que les Latins font leur repas de noel le 24 décembre et les cadeaux sont distribués jusqu'à l'Epiphanie le 6 janvier.
c'est sûr la neige , le gel ,et les châtaignes grillées sont pittoresques , mais n'ignorez pas ce qui se passe en dessous de l'équateur.Noel dans l'hémisphère sud est drôle , se passe à l'extérieur, plein de mélanges de mets différents,soleil et joie des coeurs légers .Vous devriez l'essayer un de ces jours.

-------------------
Modifié par lucile83 le 16-01-2019 07:41
Bug réparé.



Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de joe39, postée le 17-01-2019 à 11:15:12 (S | E)
Bonjour chère here4u

Voici ma traduction des les cinq phrases:

) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG, hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS and SNOW — these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas.
Des foulards et des chaussettes, une cheminée chaleureuse et confortable, du lait de poule, du chocolat chaud, des marches de Noël et la neige – voici quelques-unes des choses qui viennent immédiatement à l’esprit lorsque que nous pensons à Noël.

2) In JAPAN, ORIGAMI, hand-made LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree;
Au Japon, origami, des lanterns faites à la main et autres decorations artisanals ornent l’arbre traditionnel de Noll.

3)IN PARTS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA PEOPLE DECORATE PALM TREES
Dans certaines régions d’Afrique australe, les gens décorent des palmiers.

4)IN CHINA AND JAPAN, CHRISTMAS TREES ARE ADORNED WITH HANDMADE PAPER CHAINS, LANTERNS AND FLOWERS.
En China et au Japon, les arbres de Noll sont décores de chaines, de lanternes et de fleurs en papier faits à la main.


5)ARGENTINIANS SERVE SOMETHING CALLED “NIÑOS ENVUELTOS”, STUFFED BEEF ROLLS TRANSLATED TO “CHILDREN IN BLANKETS”
Les Argentins servent quelque chose appelé “niños envueltos », stuffed beef rolls, translated in « children in blankets ».

En vous remerciant, je vous souhaite une très bonne journée.
Joe39





Réponse : Rack your brains and Help!/ 37 de here4u, postée le 17-01-2019 à 12:49:47 (S | E)
Hello, Dear All!
Thanks a lot, Volunteers, for stepping in and translating the exercises. I'm so blessed that I even have TWO translations of the sentences... With a mix of the two, we'll reach perfection! THANK YOU!

- 1) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG, hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS, and SNOW — these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas
Echarpes, chaussettes de laine et un coin du feu chaud et douillet (un peu maladroit ...), un lait de poule , un chocolat chaud, les marchés de Noêl et la neige font partie des choses qui viennent immédiatement à l'esprit quand on pense à Noël. TTB

1) SCARVES, wool SOCKS, a warm and COSY FIREPLACE, EGGNOG, hot CHOCOLATE, Christmas MARKETS and SNOW — these are some of the THINGS that IMMEDIATELY come to MIND WHEN we THINK of Christmas.
Des foulards(In winter, "des écharpes"(= wool) are supposed to be warmer than "foulards"(=silk)) et des chaussettes DE LAINE, une cheminée chaleureuse et confortable , du lait de poule, du chocolat chaud, des marchés de Noël et la neige – voici quelques-unes des choses qui viennent immédiatement à l’esprit lorsque que nous pensons à Noël. TTB

- 2) In JAPAN, ORIGAMI, hand-made LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree;
aAu Japon , origami, lanternes faites à la main et autres décorations de création artisanale, sont installentés sur le traditionnel arbre de fête TTB

2) In JAPAN, ORIGAMI, hand-made LANTERNS, and other HANDCRAFTED DECORATIONS LINE up the TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY tree;
Au Japon, origami, des lanterns faites à la main et d'autres décorations artisanalEs ornent l’arbre traditionnel de Noll. TTB


- 3) IN PARTS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA, PEOPLE DECORATE PALM TREES ;
dans des endroits d'Afrique du Sud, les gens décorent les palmiers. (Don't forget the punctuation!) TTB

3)IN PARTS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA PEOPLE DECORATE PALM TREES
Dans certaines régions d’Afrique australe, les gens décorent des palmiers. TTB


- 4) CHRISTMAS TREES IN CHINA AND JAPAN ARE ADORNED WITH HANDMADE PAPER CHAINS, FLOWERS AND LANTERNS.
les arbres de noêl en Chine et au Japon sont ornés avec des guirlandes , des fleurs et des lanternes de papier faites à la main TTB, mais n'oublie pas ponctuation et majuscule !

4)IN CHINA AND JAPAN, CHRISTMAS TREES ARE ADORNED WITH HANDMADE PAPER CHAINS, LANTERNS AND FLOWERS.
En China E et au Japon, les arbres de Noll sont décores de chaines= guirlandes, de lanternes et de fleurs en papier faits à la main. TTB


- 5) ARGENTINIANS SERVE SOMETHING CALLED « NINOS ENVUELTOS », STUFFED BEEF ROLLS TRANSLATED TO « CHILDREN IN BLANKETS ».
En Argentine ils servent quelque chose appelé: Ninos envueltos( Bébé emmaillotés) , rouleaux farcis de boeuf qui font penser à des enfants enveloppés dans une couverture TTB

5)ARGENTINIANS SERVE SOMETHING CALLED “NIÑOS ENVUELTOS”, STUFFED BEEF ROLLS TRANSLATED TO “CHILDREN IN BLANKETS”
Les Argentins servent quelque chose appelé “niños envueltos », stuffed beef rolls, translated in « children in blankets ». Why didn't you translate the end, Joe! You were dreaming! = des rouleaux farcis de boeuf, appelés " Bébés emmaillotés". TTB

Un grand et à vous deux !
Bravo aussi pour le courage nécessaire à cette longue traduction ...

Loin de se pelotonner dans des chauds manteaux d'hiver, quand arrive décembre , les résidents de l'hémisphére sud sortent leur shorts et leur t-shirts.OUI Noêl dans le sud est une sorte d'affaire complètement différente.- Mais que pouvez- vous réellement espérer : pour vous aider à imaginer, c'est échanger la neige pour le soleil et le pudding contre des crevettes. Nous avons fait le tour (Oui ! rassemblé le ... ) du meilleur de la saison des fêtes au dessous de l'équateur. TTB
Noêl là, où les eucalyptus poussent il n'y a pas de gel ni de neige' c'est ce qui se dit dans une chanson Australienne.Eh oui, c'est bien vrai.
Si vous avez assez de chance pour passer les vacances en Australie, prenez un supplément d'écran total solaire et soyez préparés pour trois autres plaisirs : fruits de mer, salades et sport. Bien qu'il soit peu commun de manger un repas chaud , vous n'aurez pas faim. Les Australiens ont tendance à savourer des plateaux de fruits de mer, de la dinde froide et du jambon, le gâteau pavlova et bien sûr un verre de vin pétillant très frappé.
Votre propre jardin et votre piscine prennent une part importante en ce jour de Noêl avec les enfants s'ébattant dans l'eau pour essayer les nouveaux jouets de piscine et toute la famille appréciant le jeu de cricket dans l'arrière cour.
Les" KIWIS" comme les Australiens sont assez chanceux pour avoir la possibilité de célébrer Noêl dehors.Les enfants ont une longue coupure pendant la période des fêtes, ce qui veut dire que les familles peuvent faire des randonnées, explorer les criques * et les alentours des villes balnéaires.* dans les villes balnéaires et alentour. Faire du camping et bien sûr occuper l'un des meilleurs endroits de l'hémisphère sud : la plage
Et quant à envisager quoi porter et manger n'oubliez pas vos jandals (tongs) et de laisser de la place pour un long déjeuner de salades et de fruits de mer qui durera toute l'après midi du 25 décembre. Bien qu'ils décorent chez eux des sapins, les Néo Zélandais possèdent leur propre arbre de Noêl le Pohutukawa, un arbre endémique très local(pour moi, endémique est négatif ...) qui donne des fleurs rouge vif comme des boules de noêl pendant la saison des fêtes .
Le dîner sud africain ressemble davantage à un déjeuner de Noel avec ses tartelettes minces fourrées de fruits secs et le jambon en gelée ou la dinde, canard rôti et rosbif cuit au barbecue. Vous pourrez aussi essayer le riz jaune aux raisins.le gâteau à la crême glacée et le pudding malva, toute cette nourriture se dégustera en plein air par temps chaud.
Peut être la plus grande différence entre l'hémisphère sud anglais et les pays parlant espagnol est que les Latins font leur repas de noel le 24 décembre et les cadeaux sont distribués jusqu'à l'Epiphanie le 6 janvier.
c'est sûr la neige, le gel et les châtaignes grillées sont pittoresques, mais n'ignorez pas ce qui se passe en dessous de l'équateur. Noel dans l'hémisphère sud est drôle, se passe à l'extérieur, plein de mélanges de mets différents, de soleil et de joie, des le coeurs légers .Vous devriez l'essayer un de ces jours.

Bravo ! Un très bon travail ! Que dit-on à Magie et à Joe, les "jeunes" ?
Bon courage pour la suite !




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